By Durham Cathedral, Who Am I?

#durham, #cathedral, #england, #cemetery, #bishop, #priest, #history #travel, #iwonder
Alongside Durham Cathedral is an old grave yard, where I believe priests, bishops and the elite towns people have been buried.

Roaming around Durham Cathedral in Northeast England, I was busy learning about Norman architecture, the imprisonment of the Scots in the Cathedral and the bishop-princes appointed by William the Conquerer. But there was over a thousand years of history made here, and scores more facts to absorb.

Then, my attention was drawn to some unmarked tombs just outside the Cathedral.

#durham, #cathedral, #tomb, #grave, #whoisit, #history
Unusual grave marker outside Durham Cathedral.

Later research on the web provided the names of a bishop, a priest and a dean of the Cathedral buried outside the walls, but there are many more tombs than three, leaving the mystery of the tomb’s identity or date unsolved.

#durham, #cathedral, #history, #tomb, #stone, #sculpture, #history, #questions, #iwonder
What image do you decipher in this well worn tombstone?

Perhaps it is better to consider this site a place for meditation and prayer. The questions raised by death and the what happens to each of us after death have vexed the human mind for millennia. It may benefit us more to reflect on the human condition and our questions about life after death than to seek the identity of any one particular grave.

From Alnwick Castle: a gift to America

Touring the majestic Alnwick Castle in Northeast England, I expected to learn about the twelfth Duke and Duchess of Northumberland who currently live here and the history of the castle. What I never expected to learn was the story of their ancestors, which includes the gift that founded our American treasure, the Smithsonian Institution.

#alnwick, #duke, #duchess, #towers, #castle, #duchess, #northumberland, #keep, #smithson, #smithsonian, #percy
These tall towers fortify the entrance to the Keep of Alnwick Castle, home of the Duke and Duchess of Northumberland.

During the summer months when the Duke and Duchess live in their summer home near the Scotland border, the public may tour the Castle inside and out. Unfortunately, no photographs are allowed inside the private quarters. The Dining Room walls are filled with large painted portraits of the Percy family, one of whom is Hugh Smithson.

Hugh Smithson became the First Duke of Northumberland and with the Queen’s permission became a “Percy.”  Only the legitimate children of Hugh Smithson/Percy could take the name “Percy.”

James Macie, born in 1765 in France, is the illegitimate son of Elizabeth Keate Macie and Hugh Smithson. His mother had royal roots in France. At his mother’s death, James inherited her fortune and took his father’s name “Smithson.” James devoted his life to academia, studying science at Oxford University. When James died in 1829 without an heir to his fortune, his will revealed his wishes: to donate his estate to found an educational institution in a country that does not have an aristocracy and would never have a monarchy.

Here are a few more details about the founding of the Smithsonian from the Smithsonian Magazine:

Unsure of whether or not he had the authority to accept the gift, President Jackson sent the issue over to Congress where a spirited debate ensued.

“This is pre-Civil War, 1830s, and states rights versus federalism is a hugely hot issue,” Henson says. “Southerners vehemently oppose this because they believe it’s a violation of states’ rights to create such a nation entity but John Quincy Adams, really takes this on as his case and pushes it through and he eventually triumphs.” Congress authorized the U.S. to accept the bequest on July 1, 1836.

If agreeing to accept the money was complicated, deciding what to do with it was almost impossible. Smithson, who had never set foot in the United States while living, apparently never discussed the provision in his will or his plans for the Institution with anyone. So, for ten years, Congress debated what “increase and diffusion of knowledge” meant and what such an establishment would look like. Several ideas were suggested, including: a scientific institute, a teacher’s training institute, a school of natural history, a university for the classics, a national observatory, a national library and a national museum. Eventually, a political compromise was reached, which provided for many of the different ideas suggested, and the Smithsonian Institution was founded, signed into law by President James K. Polk on August 10, 1846, and funded.
Read more: https://www.smithsonianmag.com/smithsonian-institution/this-day-in-history-remembering-james-smithson-1765-1829-23450134/#gFQuEVceuvJi4Amz.99
Follow us: @SmithsonianMag on Twitter

 

Overnight in the Castle

If you would like the full experience of eating and sleeping within a Norman Castle, then Durham Castle is for you in the summer time. You can enjoy the magnificent Cathedral and the charming town with its many shops and pubs while you call Durham Castle your home away from home.

#keep, #durhamcastle, #bandb, #dorm, #university, #castle, #norman
The Keep of Durham Castle (central and most secure part of the castle) houses university students during the academic year, and is a B&B open to anyone July through September (generally).

 

Durham Castle Gate-8167LR
Just across the Palace Green from the Cathedral, you will enter the Castle through this gate.

For information, go to http://www.dur.ac.uk/universitycollege or email durham.castle@durham.ac.uk

Trump vs. the Middle Ages

When you compare the meaning of “sanctuary” in 12 c. England to 21 c. America, you might wonder about 21 century America under President Donald Trump. This year migrants are cross the American border from Mexico, seeking sanctuary from unsafe conditions, and are met with incarceration and separation from their children. Many of us Americans oppose this policy and wonder what has become of American values, in particularly freedom, individual rights and the pursuit of happiness.  With these current events in mind, I was particularly touched by the mercy demonstrated in this tidbit of history from Durham Cathedral.

In 12th century England, criminals could seek sanctuary in Durham Cathedral by knocking on this bronze knocker and hanging on to it until they were admitted. “Fugitives were given 37 days to organize their affairs. They had to decide with to stand trial or to leave the country by the nearest port.” (Quote from a sign on the Cathedral wall.)

Please note, the Cathedral provided sanctuary to criminals, not migrants, but the concept of sanctuary and mercy is cause for reflection.

#knocker, #durham, #cathedral, #sanctuary, #mercy, #criminals, #12century, #middleages, #history, #travel
This bronze knocker on Durham Cathedral is a replica of the original, which is on display in the “Open Treasure” exhibit of the Cathedral.

 

Story of the Pineapple

Inside Durham Castle, where Durham University students live during the school year, photography is not allowed. That’s too bad in my opinion, because I’d love to share with you the beautiful Norman chapel,  14 century Great Hall and more. Instead, I can share a story with you.

#durham, #castle, #durhamcastle, #norman, #university, #stories, #pineapple, #stairs, #chapel, #history
Begun in 1072 and restored in the 1800s, Durham Castle once housed bishops but now houses University students.

The grand Black Staircase curiously has pineapples carved into the wooden banister. Pineapples in England? Yes, you see it was very hard to grow a pineapple in England, and so fresh pineapples were very expensive. Back in the day, you would do your guest a great honor to serve pineapple, while at the same time, the host would have his wealth and status on display. In fact, there were stories about the Prince Bishop who lived here displaying a real pineapple as a centerpiece, and then serving a fruit that resembled pineapple, in the hope that guests might assume it was pineapple. In fact, the carved pineapple doesn’t really look much like a pineapple, so perhaps the artist had never seen one.

Finding this tale rather humorous, I asked our guide if this grand gesture of honoring a guest by serving pineapple might be the origin of the pineapple as a symbol of welcome or hospitality. (The pineapple is described this way in Newport, Rhode Island, where it also serves as a symbol of the town.) Our castle guide didn’t know the answer, but I have a good hunch about it.

Have you heard of a Prince Bishop? As the story goes, there were three earls in Northumberland. Two earls dueled and killed each other, and the third one rebelled against the king, so the English King Henry VIII had the great idea to appoint bishops as princes, give them taxing authority. They minted coins and organized an army.  Not surprisingly, the bishops were fine with this idea.

For more stories, stay tuned. There is an interesting story tied to the door knocker of the Durham Cathedral, where again no photographs were permitted.

 

 

Walking Durham

I spent the day exploring Durham, England. I caught the train from Newcastle, and walked into town, finding the central square and market. Strolling up the road, I took some photos of lovely storefronts and stopped into a few shops. (I should have titled this piece “Shopping Durham,” as my “shopping” blog posts are the most popular!)

I explored the beautiful Castle and Cathedral – more on those in the next few blog posts! One of the outdoor cafe tables at Cafe on the Green, between the Castle and the Cathedral called my name. My guidebook and journal kept me company during lunch. Then, I had the good instinct to cross the River Wear and walk along the far side, looking up at the town and the Cathedral in its summer greenery. Why? I realized that the Cathedral facade would be lit by the afternoon sun.

#durham, #durhamcathedral, #durham, #wear, #riverwear, #riverside, #walk, #summer, #trees, #northumbria, #northumberland, #england, #travel, #travelphotography
This opening in the maple tree provided a natural vignette of Durham Cathedral.

I was even able to position myself just right so the construction cloth over the tower that is under restoration was blocked by the leaves. It was a beautiful and peaceful afternoon, part of an unusually sunny summer of 2018.

Crew on the Wear

Classes have ended for the summer at Durham University, England, but students are making the most of this beautiful afternoon with a crew practice on the River Wear.

#crew, #rowing, #Wear, #river, #riverwear, #sunny, #summer, #university, #sony, #durham
Students stroke upstream on the River Wear in Durham, England.

This scene reminded me of my daughter Caitlin’s years of rowing with the Georgetown University Crew Team on the Potomac River in Washington, D.C. Such a great sport with a wonderful history.