Hawaiian lizard

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The colorful Hawaiian Anole lizard licks a bird of paradise with a purple tongue

On September 7, this lizard made my day. I captured several good photos of him on this choice orange flower, showing the sticky toes, the blue eyebrow, the color streaked back and the purple tongue. I highly recommend a stop at the Hawaiian Botanical Garden if you are visiting the Big Island of Hawaii. It is located in the rainforest just north of Hilo, off Route 19 on the “scenic route.”

Kilauea’s story

I like a photo that tells a story. This image of Kilauea’s lava flow to the ocean shows the vast expanse of land that her lava coated, wiping out the forest that grew here 20 years ago. If you look carefully through the mist for some green patches, you can see the remnants that by chance were spared from destruction.

#kilauea, #volcano, #lava, #story, #hawaii
In 1983 Kilauea’s lava took out the forest. After a road was built, it took out the end of it. Kilauea continues to add land to the island of Hawaii.

The steam on the coast blocks our view of the orange molten lava pouring into the ocean, but it tells us what is happening there – new land is forming. Do you see the road that was built over the dark lava? You can see it abruptly stops, where Pele again had the upper hand.

Looking inside Kilauea

Take a peak with me inside the world’s currently most active volcano on the Big Island of Hawaii, Kilauea. The steam is the biggest clue that it is currently erupting — pushing molten lava underground in a tube that leads to the ocean. Along the coastline more steam reveals that new land is being made there. You can also see a spot of molten lava just below the large crater in the photo.

I will do more processing on this image after I return home, but I thought my readers would like to see some early results. I like the three colors of the land in this image. It was exciting to see this unique view of the Earth evolving, and to ponder the power of Nature.

#volcano, #kilauea, #steam, #erupting, #lava, #hawaii, #nature, #aerial, #helicopter
Peering inside the crater of Kilauea on Hawaii while it is erupting.

Summer Swim

In honor of the first day of summer — a season that seemed to begin at least a month ago — I went for a swim. Not in the ocean, just at our club’s swimming pool. The folks in Hawaii no doubt took a dip in the Pacific Ocean, like these body surfers I spotted on Kauai two years ago.

#swim, #firstdayofsummer, #Kauai, #bodysurf, #lava, #ocean, #surf, #beach, #Hawaii
Body surfers throwing caution to the wind at Secret Beach on Kauai.

Check out my  new website for more images from Kauai, where ordering prints is a snap. www.cathykellyphotography.com.

U.S.S. Arizona Memorial, Pearl Harbor

#memorialday, #ussarizona, #remember, #WWII, #pearlharbor, #navy, #hawaii
U.S.S. Arizona Memorial serves as a viewing platform over the sunken wreck. 1,177 crew died on board on December 7, 1941.

As we remember, honor and pray for the brave Americans who served and died for our country on Memorial Day, I’d like to share with you the beautiful and sad U.S.S. Arizona Memorial in Pearl Harbor. If you are making a trip to Hawaii, I’d highly recommend an excursion to Honolulu, Oahu to visit this special place.

#ussarizona, #memorial, #memorialday, #pearlharbor, #hawaii, #wwii
View of the sunken USS Arizona in Pearl Harbor

The U.S.S. Arizona is a Navy ship launched in 1915, and it was bombed during  the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941 — an attack that drew the United States into World War II. That day 1,177 crew died on board the ship, and the wreck still lies in place under the water. A boat shaped viewing platform was build astride the wreckage in 1962; it hosts over 1.5 million visitors a year.

Nearby, you may also visit the U.S.S. Missouri, a retired Navy ship that hosted the signing of the armistice between the Allies and Japan in Tokyo harbor to end that same war in 1945. I highly recommend that tour as well, as it brings history alive. This plaque names the leaders who were present, including General Douglas MacArther and Fleet Admiral Chester Nimitz for the United States.

#USSmissouri, #armistice, #endofwwii, #peacetreaty, #endofthewar
#USSmissouri, #armistice, #endofwwii, #peacetreaty, #endofthewar

Reflections on a sunset

Sunsets, and especially sunsets over  the water, give us a rich feeling of satisfaction. You may have witnessed the sun sinking into the lake in front of your summer cabin or the sun sinking into the ocean from the west coast of just about any island or continent around the Globe. But why, have you wondered, do you cherish those opportunities to witness this daily event whenever you can? I can think of so many reasons — so many threads that weave a complex and rich tapestry in our minds.

Evocative sunset from Kona Coast of Hawaii, 2012
Evocative sunset from Kona Coast of Hawaii, 2012

First, you may notice the complimentary colors of orange and blue dominating the image. These colors are very pleasing to the human eye. Here, the sun sets at a great distance — as far as the eye can see on the distant horizon.  As humans, we feel a great sense of freedom and safety when we can see a long distance and see that the way is clear and without threats. Without thinking about it, we know the sun as an enormous source of energy, warmth and life. Without thinking of it, we know that water is life giving, always in motion and often signifies the journey we make through life. Without actually thinking about it, we see the clouds in motion, sometimes obscuring our view, in other places offering a window for us to see more light and more color.

We are passive observers. We cannot make this happen. We do not make this happen. Nature is powerful, very powerful.  We are not so powerful.  I am one person of billions on Earth, very small and rather fragile. As we quietly watch the sun set, we don’t have to act. We can just experience the sunset. For a few quiet minutes, we can just enjoy it. We have a few minutes to pause our busy day and reflect. This day is ending. In endings, we see beginnings. We believe the sun will rise again, and continue natural its cycle. We think about Time. Each moment is unique. Before our eyes, the view changes every moment. We can see it: each moment is fleeting and won’t be repeated. Time marches on. For how long?