Antiqued Anhinga

This monochrome treatment of the anhinga, drying its feathers, isolates the elegant dark bird from its habitat,  a busy tangle of tree branches spotted with lichen. Anhingas are plentiful in southwest Florida, tame around people, and interesting to watch as they swim underwater to catch fish. After a swim, they fan out their wing feathers to dry.

I like this the sepia effect on a square composition. While the bird takes center stage, the diagonal branch and star shaped air plant add interest. The overall effect of the image reminds me of photo taken in the early days of photography. It makes me feel akin with the wildlife explorers of old.

#anhinga, #sepia, #blackandwhite, #wildlife, #lichen, #florida, #nature
In Florida, the Anhinga dries its feathers on its perch in the trees.

Magical air plants

Tillandsia, or “air plants” for short, are magical. They attach themselves to trees and grow without soil, taking in moisture and nutrients through the air. They aren’t picky eaters: bugs, dust and decaying leaves will do. They are evergreen perennial plants that flower and make babies. You can see them everywhere in the Tropics — like in your back yard! — but you can also observe dozens of them in cypress swamps. These two caught my eye in Six Mile Cypress Swamp in Fort Myers, Florida, as they were gently lit by the setting sun.

 

#cypress, #swamp, #tree
Tillandsia attaches to cypress trunk. Lichen (white spot) is part of the scene too.

 

#Florida, #parasitic, #plant, #nature, #swamp
Evening light on flowering Tillandsia. Six Mile Cypress Swamp, Fort Myers, Florida.