Who Am I?

This mostly white bird seen in the southwest Florida swamp stumped some experienced bird watchers who were guessing its identity. What do you think? Yes, it looks like a heron with that long beak, but it’s not blue…at least not yet.

 

#heron, #blueheron, #corkscrew, #florida, #naples, #corkscrewswampsanctuary, #juvenile, #whoami, #birdphotography
This juvenile blue heron has just a hint of blue on its beak and in its feathers.

My first guess was the Wurdemann’s Heron, a  mostly white mutation of the Great Blue Heron, that I had recently learned about and sighted in Rookery Bay.  Don’t we love to put our newly found knowledge to work? But the Corkscrew Swamp Sanctuary naturalist gently corrected me: this is a juvenile Great Blue Heron.

If you have some birding knowledge to share, please leave a comment to this blog. I’m happy to start a conversation.

Roseate Spoonbill Lift Off

If you can capture a photograph of a Roseate Spoonbill when it spreads its wings to take flight, you are in for a visual treat even better than a strawberry parfait. You need to steady your lens on the bird, focus, make sure your shutter speed will freeze motion and wait.

#roseatespoonbill, #florida, #bird, #feathers, #pink, #corkscrew, #profile, #flight
Roseate spoonbill spreads its rosy wings to lift off the fence railing just a few feet from me.

These large wading birds are quick, so you must anticipate their take off. The Spoonbill’s motion parallel to the focus plane helped this image work. My settings on the Sony a7rII are ISO 1250, f /5.6 (pretty wide open lens to let in more light), 244mm, and 1/2500 second shutter speed. A higher resolution image is available on my website in the Florida Gallery: www.cathykellyphotography.com.

Putting the Rosy in Roseate

I’m captivated by the light and dark pink wings of the Roseate Spoonbill. When I find one feeding, I track it with my camera for a several minutes and try to snap an image when the bird opens its wings to hop over a log or something. When the wings open, you can see so much more color.

#roseatespoonbill, #florida, #naples, #corkscrew, #corkscrewswampsanctuary,#birdseyeview, #birdphotography, #wadingbird, #whyitspink, #Pink
Roseate spoonbill sweeping its bill through the swamp to feed. I try to capture images of the bird with open wings when I can.

I was curious what makes the bird such a beautiful shade of pink, so I did a little research. Like the flamingo, the roseate spoonbill gets its pink coloration partly from the food it eats, such as the crustaceans that feed on algae. Typical food for the roseate spoonbill includes small fish, shrimp, mollusks, snails and insects. (Source: Nature Works website.)

I’ve notice that the roseate spoonbills are social birds like their relations, the ibis. Both species feed in groups. When I observed this bird in Corkscrew Swamp Sanctuary near Naples, Florida, it was one of about eight birds feeding together. While the “Ding Darling” Nature Preserve in Sanibel Island is known for sightings of the spoonbills, I was not lucky enough to see them there this year (2018).

Exciting Sighting: Wurdemann’s Heron

I love Nature and Birds and Learning in general, so I find it super exciting to be introduced to a beautiful bird that is new to me. I spotted and photographed my first Wurdemann’s Heron in Rookery Bay south of Naples, Florida in March 2018.  What is a Wurdemann’s Heron, you might ask?

#wurdemanns, #heron, #morph, #southflorida, #rookerybay, #florida, #birdphotography, #nature, #Wildlife, #sony
From a slow moving boat around the mangroves in Rookery Bay, we spotted a Wurdemann’s Heron perched on a high branch.

It is a color morph of the Great Blue Heron and the Great White Heron. The size resembles that of the Great Blue Heron I have seen. It is a handsome bird.

#wurdemanns, #heron, #birdphotography, #bird, #southflorida, #florida, #sony, #wildlife, #nature
Seen from another angle as our boat circled the Wurdemann’s Heron’s location, you can appreciate his long legs, white belly and breeding plumage.

And one more image before he flew away.

#wurdemanns, #heron, #rare, #morph, #rookerybay, #birdphotography, #sony
The Wurdemann’s Heron shows the red shoulder of the Blue Heron and more brown coloring than either the Great Blue or Great White.

Photographer’s note: these images were shot with the Sony a2r7 and the Sony Zeiss 100-400 mm lens (at 400mm) at 1000 ISO, f/8 and 1/800 or 1/1000 second. Evening light was low, and it was necessary use a fast shutter speed to freeze the motion of the boat I was on. The Sony performed well with minimal noise and a sharp rendition of the subject. These images were cropped and processed in Lightroom;  the file size was reduced in Photoshop for the smooth loading on this blog post.

Painted Sunset

The orange hue of sunset is woven into countless blue waves lapping the shore this evening. Colors separate into horizontal lines and appear painted in this unique image.

#sunset, #orange, #orangeandblue, #gulfofmexico, #gulf, #florida, #gulfcoast, #ICM, #sony, #abstract, #warmandcool
The warm and the cool are woven together in this image.

 

Can you hear the tiny waves? Feel the warmth of the sun, offset by the breeze? Does the water reach your toes?

Interested in a print of this image? Please visit my website www.cathykellyphotography.com and look in the Gallery: Photo Illustration.

Let’s Do Sunset

It’s fun to meet a friend for sunset on the beach. It’s always a great time to relax, sip some wine and have a good conversation. Of course, this works if you live on the West Coast of Anywhere — Florida, California, Hawaii or any location in the world.

But sunset is extra special when the sun paints the clouds vivid shades of orange, pink, peach, mauve, and grey. It’s even nicer when the beach is quiet and a small egret walks along the sparkling shore.

#sunset, #egret, #clouds, #waterscape, #reflection, #gulf, #florida, #naples
Brilliant sunset on a quiet Naples beach, shared with a snowy egret.

What the Ocean Says

In literature, water often sustains life. It feeds the thirsty. Thirsty humans, animals and plants. In rivers, it flows past us in a strong steady current, often signifying our journey through life. Other times, arriving in storms it taketh away. Floods overpower human settlements and people. It kills.

What does this ocean image say to you? Is it dangerous and menacing, or does it bring you peace?

#ocean, #gulf, #florida, #water, #surf, #blue, #windy, #ICM
Rhythm of the sea on a windy day.

Point Lobos Cove

The arid landscape that you often find in California is raised up in both beauty and comfort by the Pacific Coast. While you hike, it is hot and dry and sometimes dusty. But here in Point Lobos State Reserve, you feel the ocean breezes and your eyes feast upon the soothing sight of crashing waves. The coast line, pleasingly irregular, hides a new view behind every incline and bend in the path. Just keep walking.

#landscape, #california, #pointlobos, #ptlobos, #statereserve, #montereybay, #monterey, #carmel, #thingstodo, #hike, #hikecalifornia
The hiking path in Point Lobos gives the hiker an ocean breeze and a constantly changing view of the Pacific coastline.

Colors of Point Lobos

The artist in me loves a scene with vivid complimentary colors — like yellow and blue, for example. On a sunny September morning, I found yellow and orange hues in the moss and wildflowers along the coast of Point Lobos — creating that pleasing color contrast with the blue Pacific Ocean.

#pointlobos, #hike, #california, #september, #sunnyday, #monterey, #landscape, #photography, #complimentarycolors, #arch
Fall colors along the coast in Point Lobos contrast the blue sky and water in Monterey Bay.

The stone archways tell a story of powerful water erosion over time, even though the water is rather still at this moment. The distant hillside talks to us as well. It encloses the bay, providing a peaceful, green backdrop.

To reach Point Lobos State Reserve, drive south of Carmel, California on Route 1. To purchase prints of the California coast, or other photos featured in this blog, please visit my website: http://www.cathykellyphotography.com.

My Solar Eclipse Chase

On June 25, I got inspired to photograph the Great American Solar Eclipse of 2017. I was sitting in my 97-year-old mother’s sitting room while she watched TV and I was reading articles on the Web.  Looking at a NASA map of the Zone of Totality, I estimated the cheapest flight from Pittsburgh to the Zone, would be Atlanta. I chose a site in South Carolina near the Georgia border. Concerned about supply and demand, I immediately booked plane tickets and a Hampton Inn and ordered solar glasses. Within a few days of hearing my crazy plan, my husband volunteered to come with me for moral support. My  mission to study specialized photographic techniques began.

Most helpful was the iBook “How to Photograph the Solar Eclipse” by Alan Dyer, who has traveled to numerous eclipse sites around the world. Dyer describes many different approaches and urges you to get geared up and practice. Which camera and which lens? Still photos or video? Weighing the relative difficulties of each, could I manage two set-ups, and still enjoy watching the eclipse?

I bought photographic solar filters in three sizes, an additional “Really Right Stuff” ball head for a second tripod and an intervalometer. I developed a plan to operate my Sony a7rII with a 24 mm lens and no filter on one tripod. An intervalometer would operate it automatically to take a photograph every 6 seconds for 90 minutes, so that later a time lapse video could be made. The second tripod would hold my Nikon D800 with a 200mm lens and a 1.4x teleconverter (for a 280mm equivalent focal length), dedicated to taking close-ups of the Corona at Totality. Examining the options, I decided the image resulting from this set-up was my top choice. The close-up requires a solar filter to capture all the partial eclipse images.  During Totality I would remove the filter and bracket shots (ISO 100 and f/8) one stop apart from 1 second as the longest exposure to 1/1,000 second as the fastest (1 sec., 1/2, 1/4, 1/8, 1/15, 1/30, 1/60, 1/125, 1/250, 1/500, 1/1000),  to capture the various levels of luminosity of the Corona. These images would later be combined with layers and masks to create one very special image. It was going to be tough to remain calm and also watch and wonder during Totality, as I knew I would feel really excited and Totality would last only 2 minutes and 18 seconds.

From Atlanta, we drove 2 hours north to a Hampton Inn in Hartwell, Georgia on Sunday night. On Monday morning, we left the hotel around 9am to drive another half hour to Anderson, SC to a recreational park I had pinpointed on Google Maps on Lake Hartwell. We arrived at the park, happy to find plenty of parking spaces, a lovely lake view, blue skies and a few trees to provide shade. Thanks to our Sewickley friend Sarah Hay Rawls, who lives in Atlanta now, we had some chairs to sit in while we waited 4 hours for the action to begin.

#southcarolina, #lakehartwell, #eclipse, #solareclipse, #eclipsechasing, #andersonsc, #nature
The still banks of Lake Hartwell made a serene setting to observe the day’s natural wonder.
#Sun, #solareclipse, #andersonsc, #readytogo, #nature, #photography, #lakehartwell, #eclipse
Blue skies and brilliant sunshine were a good omen as we arrived at Lake Hartwell to observe the Great American Solar Eclipse.

 

Just imagine how we felt as clouds formed just at the WRONG TIME and covered the Sun for most of the eclipse duration. Yes, weeks of focused study, a few hundred dollars in equipment, flights, hotels, rental car and two days of priceless spousal support would result in… what exactly?

Here is the image my Sony was capturing every 6 seconds. (Turn it off.) We looked at one another and shrugged.

#clouds, #solareclipse, #ithappens, #whatcanyoudo, #anderson, #southcarolina, #eclipse, #greatAmericaneclipse, #eclipse2017
While other parts of the sky remained clear, these heavy clouds covered the Sun during most of the solar eclipse as viewed from Anderson, South Carolina.

Okay, what is the good news? I captured a few close up images during the first few minutes of the partial eclipse.

#solareclipse, #greatamericaneclipse, #nikond800, #gotit, #andersonsc, #nature, #photography
We cheered as the eclipse began. My Nikon D800 was carefully focused on the Sun, so I captured the sun spots and some tonality, while the Moon took its first bite of the Sun.
#solareclipse, #greatamericaneclipse, #gotit, #andersonsc, #nikond800, #catchmeifyoucan, #nature, #photography
Clouds gave the Solar Eclipse a unique ghostly look. You can still see the sunspots. This is my favorite image.
#solareclipse, #eclipse, #partialeclipse, #clouds, #andersonsc, #nikond800, #nature, #photography, #phenomenon
Our last glimpse of the solar eclipse with clouds painting a shadow on the western edge.

The other advice that helped me manage my disappointment was from my photography mentor Gary Hart, an accomplished landscape photographer, who advised me to savor the moment and not get too involved fiddling with the camera during Totality. In fact, many solar eclipse experts emphasized that advice. Gary said, “I refuse to be so focused on getting the shot that I fail to appreciate this experience of a lifetime. I’ll take a great memory over a great photo anytime.”

We had a great experience in multiple ways — the wonderful Park family we met there, the serene setting by Hartwell Lake, the mystery of the darkening and lightening of the sky during Totality and the inexplicable special feeling that came with bearing witness to this phenomenon of Nature. I will post my video of totality in my next post.

#solareclipse, #photography, #zoneoftotality, #southcarolina, #andersonsc, #hartwelllake, #eclipsebuddies
My husband Charlie (yellow shirt) and me (blue shirt) with our eclipse buddies Don Park (left) and his son-in-law Dustin. Don is an authorized Nikon repair rep in Georgia, and Dustin works for NASA in Houston. They were as knowledgeable as they were kind!